A number of statutory exceptions lie behind many of the wrongful termination law suits that are brought to court in the United States. These are often the cases that get the most notoriety. The basic statutory exceptions that are upheld in all states are explained below.


Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 has been designed to protect employees or potential employees against discrimination when looking for employment. It specifically protects individuals who are at least 40 years of age during hiring procedures, firing processes, lay offs, and with regard to their wages and benefits including retirement practices. Modifications have been made to this act by the Older Workers Benefit Protection Act as well as the Civil Rights Act of 1991.


Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 protects individuals with a handicap status against wrongful termination due to their handicap. This act expands upon the premises set forth in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.


Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII)

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination that is based upon any of the following facets of an individual: color, race, religion, sex, or national origin.


Equal Pay Act of 1963

The Equal Pay Act of 1963 refers to a provision that specifies that the payment of wages must not be tied to the sex of an employee. While the jobs do not have to be identical, this act provides for equal wages based upon the skill set, necessary effort t complete the task, and responsibility the employee the employee holds while under employment. In short, the content of the job is what matters not the title or sex of the employee.


National Labor Relations Act of 1990 (NLRA)

While the National Labor Relations Act of 1990 has been designed to protect individuals who are part of a union, it is also designed to protect the associational rights of employees who are not in a union. In this regard, it is possible for wrongful termination to occur based upon this act even if a union does not exist within the place of employment.


Rehabilitation Act of 1973

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 is the precursor to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. It has been designed to protect individuals with handicaps from wrongful employment practices.


Intro: Several laws set forth by the United States government pertain to wrongful termination and provide firm backing for lawsuits when it occurs. One or more of the laws relating to specific reasons involved in wrongful termination can be used to back up any employee’s claim of wrongful termination.